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Arts and Crafts

Caribbean Museum Center for the Arts

Caribbean Museum Center for the Arts

CMCArts, Inc.was founded in 1994 by Candia Atwater, with the annual publication of the "Island Art & Soul" calendar of Caribbean art. In 2003, CMCArts moved into and began restoration of a wonderful, historic building on the waterfront in Frederiksted. Over the last four years, CMCArts has grown into an epicenter of activity, where residents and visitors of all ages have benefited from CMCArts' innovative arts and cultural programming. Now is an exciting and important time to be involved. The beautiful Caribbean Sea and historic Danish property offer a perfect setting for CMCArts' spacious exhibition galleries, visiting artist in residence apartments, working art studios and classrooms, a fully equipped pottery studio, gift shop, offices and protected courtyard for performances and events. Website: www.cmcarts.org

Cindy Male Art and Yoga Studios and Gallery

Cindy Male Art and Yoga Studios and Gallery

The studio/gallery is located in the turquoise part of 'The Tool Box' building on North Side Road. It features only made in St. Croix fine art, jewelry, candle curtains, cards, and other art related gifts. Join group classes in yoga on Wednesdays at 5:30 pm. Other studio activities may be found at www.illuminatedfabricartforcandles.com or www.cindymale.com. Private and group art classes may be arranged through the artist. 340-277-8651

Art and Things - Sandra Michael

Art and Things - Sandra Michael

Moko jumbies are a cultural group that originated in Africa. The slaves brought their culture with them from Africa. The Moko Jumbies are a form of Masquerading. The only difference is their stilts. They all wear mask to hide their identity. The mask is essentially a dramatic device enabling the performer to stand apart from his or her everyday role in the community. They would carry a kazoo in their mouth to disguise their voices. They wore clothing that would cover their entire bodies so you could not tell if they were male or female. My grandmother Ms. Elizabeth Clarke was a masquerader on foot and my grandfather Mr. William Robinson was a Moko Jumbie. In their younger days, their groups wore long draws with lots of lace. They also wore long dresses down to their ankles with petticoats. At some point while performing they showed off their underwear while performing by lifting their dresses over their heads. Today the Moko Jumbies are used for entertainment. In Africa they were used to carry people through crisis with the appropriate ceremonies containing the emotions of the moment in music, song and dance. In Africa masqueraders may be used for religious rituals, therapy, hierarchal ceremonies, funeral rites, after burial ceremonies, anniversaries, naming ceremonies, adolescent initiations, cure of diseases, consultations as oracles, impersonations of ancestors, judging disputes and executing criminals. The complexity of masquerading and its related public festivities suggest that it is the Sub-Saharan's principal art form.

 

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